Christina Vantzou / Michael Harrison / John Also Bennett

37,00

only 1 left

why we love this

Deeply reflective and touching the most tender tones. Seeking for perfect harmony in delicate inconsistencies.

about the record

"An observer, a pianist and a synthesist form a triangle. The observer (Christina) is both witness and guide, the pianist (Michael) is precise and intuitive, and the synthesist (John) provides a palate of drones which offer increased resonance and a supportive framework. The piano has been carefully prepared to become a resonant body. This enhancement was achieved by tuning it to two of Michael’s just intonation tunings, based on his work, “Revelation,” and North Indian classical music, or ragas. These tunings maintain mathematically precise intervals. In place of voice, sitar or tabla, is the piano, and in place of the tanpura, is the synthesizer.

Playing ragas is an ancient practice of structured improvisation. Time, knowledge and memory interplay in the body and mind of the practitioner and this is a large part of the raga practice. The raga combines with muscle memory and personal aesthetics to individuate results. Through the formation of a trio, multiple perspectives and timelines collapse and the raga mutates again. These twists and turns seem to only fall back on themselves as the raga shows us that there are multiple compositions already stored in our collective memory. They blossom, morph and spring forth like nature.

Nothing was written down to execute these recordings. The simplest forms were explored in the least complicated way. The first reflection of this process is what happens in the mind and body of the listener. The observer is always observing. Regions of sound tap into memory and imagination and the sound of the raga itself becomes a prismatic event." — Christina Vantzou

  1. 1 - Open Delay 6:20
  2. 2 - Tilang 8:42
  3. 3 - Joanna 6:10
  4. 4 - Piano on Tape 3:41
  5. 5 - Sirens 5:41
  6. 6 - Open Delay 2 3:25
  7. 7 - Harp of Yaman 4:14
  8. 8 - Bageshri 15:10

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Christina Vantzou / Michael Harrison / John Also Bennett

37,00

only 1 left

  1. 1 - Open Delay 6:20
  2. 2 - Tilang 8:42
  3. 3 - Joanna 6:10
  4. 4 - Piano on Tape 3:41
  5. 5 - Sirens 5:41
  6. 6 - Open Delay 2 3:25
  7. 7 - Harp of Yaman 4:14
  8. 8 - Bageshri 15:10

Embed

Copy and paste this code to your site to embed.

why we love this

Deeply reflective and touching the most tender tones. Seeking for perfect harmony in delicate inconsistencies.

about the record

"An observer, a pianist and a synthesist form a triangle. The observer (Christina) is both witness and guide, the pianist (Michael) is precise and intuitive, and the synthesist (John) provides a palate of drones which offer increased resonance and a supportive framework. The piano has been carefully prepared to become a resonant body. This enhancement was achieved by tuning it to two of Michael’s just intonation tunings, based on his work, “Revelation,” and North Indian classical music, or ragas. These tunings maintain mathematically precise intervals. In place of voice, sitar or tabla, is the piano, and in place of the tanpura, is the synthesizer.

Playing ragas is an ancient practice of structured improvisation. Time, knowledge and memory interplay in the body and mind of the practitioner and this is a large part of the raga practice. The raga combines with muscle memory and personal aesthetics to individuate results. Through the formation of a trio, multiple perspectives and timelines collapse and the raga mutates again. These twists and turns seem to only fall back on themselves as the raga shows us that there are multiple compositions already stored in our collective memory. They blossom, morph and spring forth like nature.

Nothing was written down to execute these recordings. The simplest forms were explored in the least complicated way. The first reflection of this process is what happens in the mind and body of the listener. The observer is always observing. Regions of sound tap into memory and imagination and the sound of the raga itself becomes a prismatic event." — Christina Vantzou

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