Mort Garson
Mother Earth's Plantasia

30,45

out of stock

why we love this

If you ever wondered what music plants would like, Mort Garson had the answer. He was convinced they like the synthetic tones of the Moog. Inspired by his wife's green thumb, he made this album to help indoor plants thrive and grow. As to whether plants really like music or not, we're not entirely sure. But one thing is for certain: this album is whimsical, charming and is guaranteed to put a smile on your face.

about the record

In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music.

Whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in this music that had no popularity at the time,” Darmet says of Plantasia’s new renaissance. “He would be fascinated by the fact that people are finally understanding and appreciating this part of his musical career that he got no admiration for back then.” Garson seems to be everywhere again, even if he’s not really noticed, just like a houseplant.

-Andy Beta

  1. A1 - Plantasia 3:21
  2. A2 - Symphony For A Spider Plant 2:41
  3. A3 - Baby's Tears Blues 3:03
  4. A4 - Ode To An African Violet 4:03
  5. A5 - Concerto For Philodendron & Pothos 3:09
  6. B1 - Rhapsody In Green 3:28
  7. B2 - Swingin' Spathiphyllums 2:59
  8. B3 - You Don't Have To Walk A Begonia 2:31
  9. B4 - A Mellow Mood For Maidenhair 2:17
  10. B5 - Music To Soothe The Savage Snake Plant 3:23

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Mort Garson
Mother Earth's Plantasia

30,45

out of stock

  1. A1 - Plantasia 3:21
  2. A2 - Symphony For A Spider Plant 2:41
  3. A3 - Baby's Tears Blues 3:03
  4. A4 - Ode To An African Violet 4:03
  5. A5 - Concerto For Philodendron & Pothos 3:09
  6. B1 - Rhapsody In Green 3:28
  7. B2 - Swingin' Spathiphyllums 2:59
  8. B3 - You Don't Have To Walk A Begonia 2:31
  9. B4 - A Mellow Mood For Maidenhair 2:17
  10. B5 - Music To Soothe The Savage Snake Plant 3:23

Embed

Copy and paste this code to your site to embed.

why we love this

If you ever wondered what music plants would like, Mort Garson had the answer. He was convinced they like the synthetic tones of the Moog. Inspired by his wife's green thumb, he made this album to help indoor plants thrive and grow. As to whether plants really like music or not, we're not entirely sure. But one thing is for certain: this album is whimsical, charming and is guaranteed to put a smile on your face.

about the record

In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music.

Whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in this music that had no popularity at the time,” Darmet says of Plantasia’s new renaissance. “He would be fascinated by the fact that people are finally understanding and appreciating this part of his musical career that he got no admiration for back then.” Garson seems to be everywhere again, even if he’s not really noticed, just like a houseplant.

-Andy Beta

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